Current Research on Fish and Fisheries


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Muskellunge

The upper St. Lawrence River is widely known for its world-class Great Lakes strain muskellunge (Esox masquinongy) fishery. This population has been proactively managed through the efforts of an International St. Lawrence River Muskellunge Working Group that led to the development of a muskellunge management plan that has evolved over three decades. The goal for management remains: “To perpetuate the muskellunge as a viable, self sustaining component of the fish community in the St. Lawrence River, and to provide a quality trophy fishery”. The process has served as an effective model for regional conservation of an apex top predator that Read more about this research…


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Fishes of Onondaga Lake

Onondaga Lake is in a state of recovery following the closure of a chlor-alkali facility in 1986 and repeated improvements to the metropolitan sewage treatment plant. Dr. Neil H. Ringler, Vice Provost for Research at SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry began studying the lake in 1986 with the aid of undergraduate and graduate students. During the late 1980’s and early 1990’s they found a littoral zone devoid of macrophytes, a warm water fish community dominated by planktivorous fish, and low abundance and diversity of benthic macroinvertebrates. The fish community continued to be dominated by planktivorous fish (gizzard shad/white Read more about this research…


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Fishes of Palawan

The cyprinid fauna of Palawan are considered depauperate. However, the 2007 discovery of a new species and the collection of potentially undescribed populations warrant further study. Of the ten cyprinids known to Palawan today, eight are endemics. However, their taxonomy, distribution, and conservation status is poorly known while the introduction of exotic Nile tilapia and habitat degradation are emerging threats. Project Title: Biodiversity of Cyprinid Fishes of Northern Palawan, Philippines Summary: Given that Palawan has few resident ichthyologists conducting freshwater fish research, this project will enable us to 1) address knowledge gaps and educate local people about cyprinid biodiversity and Read more about this research…


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River Herring

River herring is the collective name for two anadromous (land-sea migrating) species of herring: blueback herring Alosa aestivalis and alewife A. pseudoharengus. Once incredibly abundant, they have declined to historically low numbers and are currently listed as Species of Concern under the Endangered Species Act. River herring spawn in rivers, estuaries, and coastal ponds, where the juveniles rear, but then migrate out to the Atlantic Ocean, where they become vulnerable to fisheries that are targeting other species (hence they are called “bycatch”). Project Title: Determining the Origins of River Herring in Marine Bycatch Summary: Using a combination of state of Read more about this research…


Arapaima
Arapaima

Arapaima are among the largest freshwater fishes in world, exceeding 3 m and 200 kg. Arapaima are a ‘flagship species’ for conservation of Amazonian ecosystems because their protection requires conservation of freshwater and terrestrial systems that have high biodiversity. In spite of their endangered status (IUCN 2006), Arapaima remain among the most sought-after food fishes in tropical South America. Their populations appear to be depleted by over-fishing in many areas, and especially near large cities. Community-based management programs and protected areas offer hope for recovery of over-exploited Arapaima populations. A present-day lack of knowledge on their basic biology, however, may Read more about this research…